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After almost 17 years from the time the first one was launched, the phone that everyone called “legend” or unbreakable (or whatever it may be), is making an appearance again on the modern times, making its return much anticipated other than the newer Nokia smartphones launched by HMD Global on the last Mobile World Congress (MWC) at Barcelona, Spain.

Upon the announcement of its return, HMD Global is surely expecting the reactions and expectations of the people – they should make it unbreakable like the old 3310. The internet gone crazy, and all expectations have been set – from how does it look like, to its known very long battery life, and to its durability that when dropped, either the floor will be broken or there will be a huge hole in the ground – which were the most popular meme about it.

But, have you ever thought why this dumb phone is making its return? On the era of smartphones, where everything should be versatile and powerful, HMD Global thinks that there is still room for the brick phone that was very popular before and now, yet that perception might not be true.

[section label=”Usability” anchor=”usability”]
Snake in the new Nokia 3310 (photo from FeverMagazine)

First, we will talk about the usability. Yes, you can definitely use the new 3310 as a backup phone, especially on areas where stealing is notorious, or when you are bored and have nothing else to do – just play the new Snake. Or on the times of disasters where longer battery life is necessary (the new Nokia 3310 offers a MONTH of standby time). But, here’s the catch.

The Nokia 3310 runs only on 2G networks [apparently the ones being used by the old 3310 – which is the 900MHz and 1800MHz, which was already shut off in many places] (and this is why so many users especially in regions like the U.S where 2G networks were already killed are disappointed) – meaning that there’s no LTE/3G/4G, just the older standard 2G which will be enough to send your SMS. And though you can surf the internet on the new Nokia 3310, it will be extremely slow due to the fact that it only runs on 2G network (with speeds of only ~300kbps).

[section label=”Replacement Cases” anchor=”rep-cases”]

Second, many people didn’t like the fact that the front housing case cannot be replaced or removed, unlike the older Nokia 3310 – where you can find a lot of front and back case replacement, for ultimate personalization.

(photo from NowGSM)
(photo from NowGSM)
(photo from NowGSM)
(photo from NowGSM)
(photo from NowGSM)
(photo from NowGSM)

Even the keypads itself, can be replaced before. Now, we’re left with few dumb color choices and only a removable back cover – which in my opinion, doesn’t make sense replacing unless dBrand will make some dope vinyl skins for it.

Replacement keypads for Nokia 3310
Replacement keypads for Nokia 3310
Default keypad of Nokia 3310
Default keypad of Nokia 3310
[section label=”Price to Performance” anchor=”p2p”]

Third, speaking of the price ($63 / PhP3190.00) – many people think that the new Nokia 3310 isn’t practical to buy anymore. Because, why bother buying a phone that you cannot use anymore right? Or why bother buying a phone that you don’t even know if it performs the same than its predecessor, or personalize it according to the way you like?

Simply, people can’t just waste anymore on a ‘gimmick’ to make money from an almost dead phone series – resurrected in order to make it profitable and make Nokia’s name to rise from the ground.

Especially when some articles about its usability appeared (regarding the 2G networks problem) and some hands-on videos on YouTube. The hype already sank from the ship it was sailing and the train that the people have aboard before it’s launch had already stopped.


[section label=”Final Words” anchor=”final-words”]

Our say: The Nokia 3310 – whatever the variant is (old and new) will be remembered for its sturdiness and its legend stories, no matter what happens. For the new Nokia 3310 by HMD Global, it will be used by many people just for a short amount of time, and it will end up in the hands of collectors, apparently. We don’t say that we hate the new Nokia 3310, however, we are just saying our opinions on why the trend is seemingly lost after its launch.