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Why the Razer Phone doesn’t have the headphone jack? CEO Min-Liang Tan explains…

It’s not just about riding the ‘goodbye headphone jack’ bandwagon

Over the past few years, we have seen some major smartphone brands who took the ‘courage’ to change, and remove the port that most of us had really loved – the 3.5mm audio headphone jack. That courage took a lot of debate on social networking sites and websites all around the globe.

Although wireless Bluetooth headphone users doesn’t care anymore, because they’ve forgotten the said jack since they’ve made the switch to wireless, we still want to know why, right?

When Apple started the trend with the iPhone 7, most smartphone users doesn’t have a choice but to buy expensive ‘dongles’ just only to plug in their ancient earphones that uses the 3.5mm connector. But, in our opinion, why does it bother more to spend $20-30 on a dongle than spending more than $500 on a smartphone?

However, there are some reasons why Apple did this, not only because they want to goat more money from their loyal iFans, but it was because they need a space for the Taptic Engine (the one that is responsible for the haptic feedback of the iPhone 7’s home button), as well as waterproofing, which we find a little bit absurd because Samsung’s Galaxy S8 was IP68-certified while retaining the 3.5mm jack, yet the iPhone 7 has only IP67-certification.

There’s also Google, who blatantly flamed and made fun of Apple with its ads for its Pixel smartphones last year, yet with the Pixel 2, they’ve also ditched the said beloved port.

So what would be Razer’s reason on getting along with the aforementioned trend?

image: Razer

The recent launch of the Razer Phone made headlines because of its 120Hz display, as well as other awesome specs such as 8GB of RAM, Dolby Atmos front-firing speakers and of course, the removal of the 3.5mm headphone jack.

Learn more about the Razer Phone HERE.

Some fans were turned off immediately and looked up for another smartphone to buy because of that, citing pricing, convenience and/or audio quality as their reasons for sticking with wired headphones. While wireless offered convenience because there’s no wires to untangle or being cut, audio quality with wired headphones still matters the most.

To others, it’s a dick move, but for us, it is for the better.

Razer’s CEO Min-Liang Tan took his sentiment on Facebook about the company’s decision to remove the headphone jack.

I see a lot of feedback on the removal of the headphone jack on the Razer Phone – and I wanted to share some of the thought process when we made the decision.

By removing the headphone jack – we were able to increase the battery size significantly (I estimate we added 500maH more), improve thermals for performance and a whole lot more.

The trade off was not having the jack – but what sealed it for me was that we were able to get audiophile quality sound with the dedicated 24-Bit THX Certified DAC adapter – and I made sure we included that with every phone. Which basically means we give even better quality headphone audio for those who want to hold on to their analog headphones.

On top of that, we’ve released the HammerHead USB C (retails at $79.99) and the HammerHead BT with all day battery life (US$99.99 – or free with Paid to Play!) which makes it a complete solution.

So in short, removing the headphone jack gave better performance, more battery – and on top of that, better headphone audio performance with existing headphones and the option to go completely wireless or jacked in via USB.

I can’t speak for other phone companies who made the decision to remove the headphone jack – but I think you guys can see why we did so.

image: Razer

While USB-C accessories are still expensive for now, we hope that sooner, all will adopt the USB-C standard so that these accessories can be made more affordable. By more people using the port, there will be more accessories made available as well.

One port for everything and greater audio quality and capabilities are what we are looking forward to, not so many connectors for each device you’ll bring.


Now, after reading this article, what do you think of the trend on removing the 3.5mm headphone jack? Let us know in the comment section below!

Written by Bryan Snow

Bryan Snow

Editor-in-Cheap of SnowTechStuff. Currently studying at Polytechnic University of the Philippines – Manila as a Computer Science student.

Loves to mingle and write about tech, tho when he’s not working, he’s watching K-Dramas, or videos on YouTube. And he’s always on a budget.

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